Couple outdoor sitting on back of parked truck hugging their golden retriever

Any time you’re looking to put some money back in your monthly budget, refinancing your auto loan can be a great place to start. You can find savings with a lower interest rate, or you can choose to extend the term to get lower monthly payments. Depending on what you’re hoping to accomplish, refinancing an auto loan could be a good option for you.

When an auto refinance can work in your favor
Let’s say you bought a new car or truck and used special dealership financing. For choosing that financing and the higher rate that goes with it, you likely received special incentives and cash-back offers. But if you’ve owned the vehicle for at least 90 days, and today’s rates are lower, refinancing could save you money every month and over the life of the loan.  

Has your credit improved?
When your credit score improves, it can increase your chances of securing a lower rate for loans. That can include auto loans. If your credit score is better than it was when you originally financed your vehicle, there is a good chance you can get a better rate to lower your monthly payments and the amount of interest paid overall.  

When to avoid refinancing
If you’re almost done paying off your auto loan or you’ve already made more than half of the payments, refinancing may not be your best bet. While the monthly savings help you in the short term, the new interest payments over several more years can add up.  

Solarity can refinance your auto loan
Thanks to no loan setup fees or penalties for early payoffs, known as a prepayment penalty, Solarity makes it easy and affordable to refinance your newer car or truck. With flexible terms, Solarity also offers new and used auto loans with quick pre-approvals online or financing at any car lot participating in the Dealership Partner Program. 

 

All loans are subject to credit approval and not all applicants will qualify. Special terms and conditions may apply. All rates are quoted as Annual Percentage Rate (APR). Rates may be higher based on credit history and term.